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The Cheat Sheet: Moroccan Rugs

We break down four popular styles of these textile treasures

FROM LEFT Examples of a Moroccan Wedding Blanket, Boucherouite, Beni Ourain, and Azilal, all from nuLOOM Rugs. Photographed by Genevieve Garruppo
FROM LEFT Examples of a Moroccan Wedding Blanket, Boucherouite, Beni Ourain, and Azilal, all from nuLOOM Rugs. Photographed by Genevieve Garruppo

If you’re a Lonny reader, chances are you have more than a passing familiarity with Moroccan rugs. The traditional tribal weavings are both rooted in heritage and totally of the moment—coveted on Pinboards and design blogs, stocked in high-end showrooms, displayed in celebrity homes, and made accessible to the average consumer via well-made replicas from mass retailers. But the nuances of these now-ubiquitous textiles can be subtle indeed. We spoke with Nicole Moosavi, president of nuLOOM Rugs, to get the lowdown on four dominant styles.

The Cheatsheet: Moroccan Rugs
The Cheatsheet: Moroccan Rugs

A high-pile or shag style woven in wool, this variety is embellished with colorful, abstract designs and patterns improvised by the maker.

The Cheatsheet: Moroccan Rugs

Currently the trendiest Moroccan rug style, this high-pile wool design has a neutral ivory background and a contrasting geometric pattern, usually in black or brown.

The Cheatsheet: Moroccan Rugs

A form of recycling, this highly textural rug is created using fabric remnants and a free-form design. You’ll see the largest array of colors used in this style.

The Cheatsheet: Moroccan Rugs

 

Traditionally created for a bride on her wedding day, this piece is identified by its textural striping and sequin embellishment. While vintage versions are best displayed on a wall or used as a floor covering in low-traffic areas, new replicas are produced specifically to be rugs.

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