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Five Ideas to Steal From a Tiny New York City Kitchen

A super functional kitchen in a 300 square feet? Here's how to make it a reality.

Interior and knitwear designer Mischa Lampert's 300-square-foot New York City apartment is a feat of engineering to be studied by all small-space dwellers, but her kitchen in particular, makes the most of what could have been a dire situation. From selectively hiding and displaying choice elements to employing a monochromatic palette, Lampert has learned a thing or two about creating a functional and beautiful kitchenette. Here, five space-saving tricks you probably haven't tried. 

All photography by Genevieve Garruppo for Lonny
All photography by Genevieve Garruppo for Lonny

1. Blur the Lines. Forgo a traditional tile backsplash in favor of a simple mirror. It reflects light, is easy to clean, and lends the space a glam note—essential for making it feel at one with the surrounding living spaces. 

2. Go For Cohesion. Mismatched cabinetry and mixed metal finishes have been a major trend in kitchen design lately, but in this mini setup a strict all-white color palette for the counters, cabinets, and even sink fittings feels like both a statement and a bit of trompe l'oeil. 

3. Vary Storage Options. A mix of slim open shelving below and traditional cabinetry above ensures that everyday items are easily accessible (and requires they be beautiful), while unsightly necessities can be hidden away.

Five Ideas to Steal From a Tiny New York City Kitchen

4. Hide Your Workhorses. In most kitchens, necessity puts appliances front and center, but when your space is as multipurpose as Lampert's, stowing some components away ensures the gritty details don't overwhelm the decor. A single convection stovetop keeps a low profile on the counter, while a mini fridge and oven are tucked snugly underneath.

5. Keep 'Em Separated. This kitchen's essentials are broken up into two areas. A sink setup to the left of the front door, and a stovetop, fridge, and oven disguised behind a curtain to the right. While a bit unconventional, the scale of the space means the components aren't any farther apart than they might be in a standard size space.

Five Ideas to Steal From a Tiny New York City Kitchen

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